In honor of the approach of Mother’s Day, the moms of Calico Spanish would like to remind you about our free printable.  It’s a fun and easy way to give kids the opportunities to sing their mom’s praise in Spanish.  Enjoy!

 

Happy Mother’s Day!

Mother's Day printable in Spanish

¡Feliz Día de la Madre!

We recently saw an adorable Mother’s Day “My mom and I” printable activity in English.  We love these activities and thought it was such a great idea we’d do something similar in Spanish. In ours, we’ve featured some of our Stories Online characters with their moms and grandmothers.  Here at Calico Spanish, we are moms and love to honor mothers and all they do, in everything from our content to our support for homeschool families to the way we package and distribute our materials.

What mothers are in our Stories?

In the Stories Online program, here are some of the mamás and abuelas children will meet:

  • At the beginning of Level B, “I Love My Family,” we meet Alicia, la mamá de Pepe, el perro café.  It’s Pepe’s birthday and she has a gift for him, a new collar in his favorite color, negro.  He tells her, “¡Te amo, Mami!
  • Later in Level B, we meet Camilo el conejo blanco in the park and he’s with his abuelo and abuela.  His abuela helps him understand that he’s especial because even though he isn’t athletic and doesn’t like to play soccer like Pepe and Goyo el gato negro, he’s who he was meant to be: he’s good at jumping, he loves to read, and he likes to play hide-and-seek.
  • At the end of Level B, in the lesson on pets, María la mona amarilla wants to tell her friends all about her abuela‘s new pet, a pájaro azul named Perico.
  • In Level C, “I Live Here,” we’re invited into the home of Rita la rana verde and her family.  In their multigenerational home, Rita’s abuela lives with them.  Rita ends her busy day with her abuela helping her find her favorite storybook and reading it with her until she falls asleep.  “Buenas noches, nena.  Sueña con los angelitos,” her abuela tells her.

Kids can meet all of these characters and their friends and family right now, because your first seven days of learning are absolutely free, with no restrictions.  It’s ideal for children ages 5-9 in any learning context, including preschool, kindergarten, elementary, and homeschool situations.

Where’s the activity?

Here we offer you a PDF download of the printable in a version for mamás and a version for abuelas. It asks children to tell us about their mamás and abuelas:

  • My mom/grandma is named _________.
  • My mom/grandma is ___________ and ___________. (Example: tall and smart)
  • With my mom/grandma, I like to ______________.
  • I love my mom/grandma because _________________.

Ready for your free download?  Just click one of the images for your PDF.

Mother's Day printable: Mi mamá y yo

Click for PDF.

Abuela version of Mother's Day printable in Spanish

Click for PDF.

 

And happy Mother’s Day from the moms of Calico Spanish!

Happy Mother’s Day from Calico Spanish!

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It’s no secret: young children love games.  (And really, don’t most of us?)  It can be challenging, though, to find a game for the early Spanish language classroom that is fun, useful, and authentic.  Pañuelito fits that bill perfectly.

How to play the game

Pañuelito, also often called el juego del pañuelo, is  historically common in several Spanish-speaking countries.  Traditionally, the game is played with numbers.  Here’s how that goes:

  1. A group of children is divided into two equal groups.
  2. Within each team, each child is assigned a number, beginning with 1.
  3. Someone stands in a place equidistant from the two teams, holding a handkerchief.
  4. The person in the middle calls out a number
  5. The child on each team that was assigned that number races to grab the handkerchief before the child from the other team can reach it.
  6. The child who grabs the handkerchief first races back to her original position.  If she arrives there, she wins the point.  However, if the child who didn’t get the handkerchief can catch her first, then he wins the point, and she loses.

Language targets in the game

You can enjoy playing with any vocabulary, not just numbers. Try assigning students colors, food words, and more. You need a minimum of four players and two category words in order to play, and you can play with as many players as you like.

We incorporated Pañuelito into Calico Spanish Stories Online Level C.  That level is titled “I Live Here.” In it, Rita la rana verde (the green frog) has a fun day playing around her house with her family and a few friends, including Goyo from Level B and a rather high-maintenance ratón named Raúl.  At one point, they go to the sala in her house and end up playing this fun game.

In Level C, we suggest using the following vocabulary as categories to support the level’s learning targets:

  • rojo, gris, verde
  • feliz, triste, aburrido, cansado
  • cocina, sala, baño, cuarto
  • grande, pequeño, listo, inteligente

But what about showing comprehension?

You may have noticed that this game uses vocabulary devoid of any context.  That’s pretty much not okay.  However, it’s super easy to ask children to show they know what their category actually means:

  • Give them something of the color to hold up when it’s their turn to run.
  • Ask them to show a number of fingers that matches their number.
  • Require a gesture showing the word or phrase’s meaning before a point can be earned: the child pretends to cook for cocina, or pretends to wash hands for baño, sleep for cuarto, or use a remote control for sala.

Example

Still can’t visualize how this game happens?  Here’s an example.

Aaron holds the pañuelo in the middle.  Two students are on each team, and one is assigned feliz and the other is assigned triste.

Each team stands about six feet away from Aaron.  Aaron calls out, “¡Feliz!” and each child assigned feliz begins to run for the pañuelo.  Theo from Team 1 reaches Aaron first and grabs the pañuelo and begins to run back to his place on Team 1.

Mariah from Team 2 races to try to catch him but doesn’t catch him in time.  He makes it back before Mariah can catch him, then shows a happy face to show he knows what feliz means.  So,Theo gets the point for Team 1.

Mariah goes back to her place on Team 2 to try again on another turn.

If you want something more to print out, here is a PDF of our instructions directly from the Stories Online Level C Teacher’s Guide.

Resources

One more thing before we go: the only things the Pañuelo game and this song have in common are the words pañuelito and that they’re both part of Stories Online Level C, but here’s our song for you anyway:

 

Role play for young learners? Yes, please!

It’s no secret: in early language education (and even in middle and high school!), finger puppets are a win! Somehow, sometimes, it seems less intimidating to pretend you’re a puppet speaking Spanish rather than be yourself speaking Spanish.  Of course, young children usually love any kind of role play with stuffed or puppet creatures.  (My children can’t get enough of Toca Boca’s record-a-scene feature.)

So, when a customer recently suggested stuffed toys of the Calico Spanish Stories Online characters, or maybe puppets, we jumped on the idea.  We’d already played around with creating a foldable version of Rita la rana verde, but let’s just say that idea didn’t pan out.  It turned out that folding a proper frog doll from a sheet of cardstock was a project worthy of a college architecture class.  We knew the characters needed to be easy to make.  We researched some designs for puppet characters and our amazing graphic artist came up with foldable cone finger puppets.  She didn’t stop there.  She made the backgrounds!  And then she made Pepe’s birthday cake and birthday presents!

Meet our finger puppets

We’re making Pedro el pez azul and María la mona amarilla available here on the blog.  Other characters, including Pepe el perro café and Goyo el gato negro, as well as the backgrounds and props for playing with the characters, will be made available on the member site.  Stories Online subscribers will have access to printables of all our characters and various backgrounds and props.  Just click the image below for the PDF of Pedro and María.

Finger puppet printable of Pedro the blue fish and María the yellow monkey

Click for PDF.

But what if the kids want to color it?

Or if you have 300 students who each want their own puppets and who’s going to make that many color copies?  We’ve made you a blackline version, too.

Pepe who and Stories what?

Haven’t met Pepe el perro café or tried Stories Online yet?  If you click the red button on the homepage, you’ll quickly be into your 7-day free trial.  You get to explore 100% of our content (including the printable puppets) for 7 days with no obligation.  Enjoy, and please tweet, Instagram, or email us your pictures of your learners using these great finger puppets!  We love to see kids learning with our products.

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So, how are you today? ¿Cómo estás?

It’s one of the first things we teach our learners to understand and answer, and for good reason.  Particularly young children will hear “How old are you?” quite a bit, and of course “What’s your name?” but right up there in the most common questions anyone hears in any context is

¿Cómo estás?

We were inspired by a video we saw in another language recently to create one for your early Spanish learners.  In our video, our Stories Online characters ask “¿Cómo estás?” and introduce children to six ways to answer this common question.  After the introduction, we invite children to use one of the suggested answers to let you know how they’re doing today.  This lesson video is perfect for classes from preschool to kindergarten to upper elementary school.

The characters and suggested answers in the video come from the Video Stories that are the foundation of our Stories Online program.  In Stories Online, children interact with real language as our animal characters talk and play in fun, engaging video stories.  Each unit in a Stories Online level is based on a single story with 10-12 lesson plans of ways to interact with and supplement the stories to keep kids engaged in acquiring real language to use with real people.  Exploring 100% of our content for free (with no credit card required) is as easy as visiting our homepage and looking for the red button.

To accompany the video, we created a free activity sheet (see below) for children to use to help them answer this very common question.  So, what are the suggested answers in the video and sheet?

  • Estoy bien
  • Estoy mal
  • Estoy cansada*
  • Estoy feliz
  • Estoy muy bien
  • Estoy aburrido*

Here’s the video!

To download the activity sheet with both versions included, click here.

*The gender of the adjectives cansada and aburrido on the activity sheet matches the gender of the character illustrating those answers.
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How can we help our kindergarten learners be successful in their Spanish language journey?  In this post, we offer some tips from the trenches of that sunny-yet-conflicted zone called kindergarten.

1. Establish successful routines.

5 tips for Successful kindergarten SpanishAll elementary children thrive on routine, but we’ve especially seen this in kindergarten.  These learners have moved from a primarily play-to-learn environment in preschool or at home into a more structured learning environment.  Sometimes it’s the first time they’re wearing a uniform.  Sometimes it’s the first time they’re required to stand in a line.  It’s a new world, and children can feel anxious about all the changes.  Accordingly, the best kindergarten teachers incorporate specific routines to help learners know what to expect and when.  World language class is no different.

In addition to helping children feel comfortable, routines help you as the teacher stay in the target language.  The first time you institute a routine like a conversation circle, you may need to give instructions in English and act out what you’d like children to do.  After that, however, you’ll quickly be able to request that learners get ready to accomplish the activity or task in the target language, all the time.

Music is one of the most effective ways to build fun routine into the class period.  Here are some examples of how we’ve used music to built successful routines into our curriculum (Classic for Schools in particular):

  • Children begin class with “Hola a todos.”
  • Transitions between activities happen with “Señor Reloj.”
  • The song “A limpiar” gets children cleaning up after an activity.

2. Change activities frequently.

When high school teachers talk about working their Spanish curriculum and lesson plans into 90-minute block schedules, they talk about changing activities.  What they usually mean is scheduling 2-3 separate tasks or activities in that 90 minutes to break up the block.  In kindergarten, that pace of change is a recipe for disaster.

You almost cannot change activities frequently enough for kindergarteners.  Any one task or activity should occupy no more than 7 or 8 minutes in class.  In a 60-minute class period (yes, some elementary teachers DO get them that long!) we’re talking 10-15 separate tasks or activities for a successful lesson schedule.  Here’s a sample sequence of activities in one 20- to 30-minute class period from Level B of Stories Online:

  1. Use the flash cards for jugar and correr to ask children whether they like to play and run.
  2. Watch and do the motions to the music video “Vengan ya.”
  3. Watch the Video Story “En el parque con los abuelos” and prompt children to run when they hear a form of correr and to play patty-cake when they hear a form of jugar.
  4. Help children describe the video by saying that the characters corren en el parque and juegan en el parque.
  5. Show the Diálogo portion of the Video Story and use the actions to show comprehension of jugar and correr again.
  6. Show pictures from picture books and ask children to point to someone who is showing either jugar or correr.

That’s six separate activities for a 20- to 30-minute class period.  All of our lesson plans are written this way, because this frequency of change is what the little ones need.

3. Embrace the (structured) chaos.

Just to keep it real, rare is the kindergarten child who loves to sit and be quiet.  And that is okay.  There is perhaps a bit too much of “sit and be quiet” told to our kindergarteners.  Sure, it’s going to be a little chaotic, but embrace who these little guys are.  Of course we need structure and consistent expectations for successful learning, but consider these tips for integrating their natural inclination to move into class:

  • Vary seating (carpet squares vs. desks vs. tables).
  • Plan standing activities (or do one spontaneously on extra jumpy days).
  • Got a child who seems to need to always be tapping something? Let him/her tap a leg instead of the table.  This respects their movement without so much noise.
  • Stage conversation activities in which children walk around asking each other a question such as “¿Qué tiempo hace?
  • Incorporate movement into games.  (Stories Online incorporates games like “Matamoscas” and “Doña Ana” to reinforce key concepts with movement.)

4. Use a mantra (or three).

Even with frequent changes in activity, holding kindergarten children’s attention is a challenge.  Consider using a mantra like “We learn Spanish with our eyes and ears” to consistently bring back children’s attention.  Drop the words “eyes” and “ears” and ask children to fill them in for you.  You’ll regain their attention while reminding them why you need it- so they can be successful on this journey.

5. Choose worksheets wisely.

In kindergarten Spanish, art projects should support language goals.

Art projects in Spanish class? Make them count for language!

This heading can be subtitled “Spanish minutes are not Art minutes.”  That’s not to say there’s no overlap or no value in incorporating artistic projects into Spanish class.  Classic for Schools includes a suggested art piece in each chapter.  The point is that teachers have a limited amount of time to provide rich, comprehensible input to their learners, and if the art piece is taking away those precious minutes, it needs adapting, or even eliminating.  Consider what directions can be used and repeated in the process, or what learners can listen to during the activity.  Too many kindergarten Spanish learners are handed a paper that involves nothing more than something along the lines of “Dog in Spanish is perro. Color the perro,” and that is “Spanish class.”  There are worksheets, and then there are successful worksheets.

For tips on how to adapt worksheets for preliterate learners, with a free download of one of our Stories Online Activity Sheets, see this blog post, as well as our Instagram feed.

What other tips have helped your kindergarten Spanish learners succeed?
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Are you a teacher who has recently subscribed to Stories Online and wants to know what content you can share with parents at home?  We often receive this question – time for a blog post to answer it!

Rewind… Stories OnWhat?

Calico Spanish Stories Online is our all-online program developed to fill a need for effective Spanish curriculum for young children regardless of the teacher/parent’s Spanish ability.  While we still believe children need intentional interaction with a guide and technology doesn’t replace that, we do believe that children and their non-Spanish-speaking teachers and parents can accomplish something given the right tools.  We set out to make that tool.  What we came up with turned out to be so good, it’s increasing in popularity among Spanish-speaking teachers in the classroom, as well.

Stories Online currently consists of 3 levels:

  1. Level A: “I’m special!
  2. Level B: “I love my family!
  3. Level C: “I live here!

Briefly: each level consists of 8 units, with lesson plans for between 11 and 13 days per unit.  Each unit is based on a Video Story featuring fun animal characters and comprehensible Spanish (no English, though translations are included in the Teacher’s Guide).  In each lesson plan, children interact with the Video Story and various associated activities to help them acquire the Spanish needed to accomplish the lesson goal.

Got it.  So what can I share?

If you have a subscription to Stories Online, you’ve purchased access to all of our content, in all of the levels, all of the time.  So what are the limits?

Only digital? Only yours.

For content that only exists digitally, those products are only part of our membership site, and they are password restricted.  These include the Story Videos, Storybook Videos, and the Dialogue Videos.

Basically, your username and password is for your use only.  Your membership is for one teacher to use with all that teacher’s students.  Please do not share your username and password for anyone else to use.

Printable? Share it!

Many of the pieces of the curriculum that are available on the digital site are printable.  You are able to print all of the student Activity Sheets, including those associated with our innovative Culture Capsules.  Please feel free to send copies of these home for students and parents to work on together.  You may foster a better community effort among your young learners and even inspire a family to learn a new language by asking parents to help children with Culture Capsules and asking children to use their Activity Sheets to present what they’ve learned to loved ones at home.

Playable? Share it!

Of course, our extensive collection of videos available on YouTube is viewable anytime, anywhere.  We recommend you give parents the links to videos you’re using in any given unit.  These videos can even be embedded on your school webpage.

We also have used the engaging platform Sugarcane to create several fun games directly related to our content for you to use and share.  Within the membership site, you can navigate to Resources/Games and click on Play Now to locate these games and then share the URL.  Also, you can view all of our games by visiting our content directly at Sugarcane.  One exception: Our proprietary concentration game is only accessible via the Membership site at this time, but there are several of this type available on our Sugarcane account.

We’re thankful you allow us to partner with you in guiding your learners on their Spanish-language journey.  And we’re thankful that so many teachers are concerned enough with digital copyright law to ask us this question.

Where will you (and those at home) take your young learners today?
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Once upon a time, I thought I’d figured out how to teach elementary Spanish. Then, they asked me to teach preschool.

Tips and free video lesson for effective Spanish in preschool from Calico Spanish.Preschool is a different sort of animal. Standing in a line is a fluid concept. Rules my son’s 3-year-old class worked on last year:

– We do not lick the wall.

– We do not lick our friends.

I kid you not. Preschool is a jungle. But it’s a precious jungle. It’s one where the kids come right out and ask me, “But can’t you talk normal?”

How do you teach Spanish in this jungle?   Can you teach real Spanish in the preschool jungle? Yes. And though the sweet spot for Calico Spanish Stories Online is really from ages 5 to 9, it works quite well in preschool, too; let us take a moment to show you how.

Cut the time.

Sometimes, in Calico Spanish Stories Online Level C, for example, you’ll find a lesson plan full of rich activities that you can’t effectively accomplish in less than 30 to 40 minutes.  Preschoolers cannot handle that much.  You’ve got to break it down.  I used to think the preschool department was crazy to give me only 15 minutes.  Then I discovered 15 minutes was perfect.  One problem though: I only had 15 minutes per week.  My ideal schedule: 15-20 minutes every day.  Maybe 10-15 minutes twice a day.  Tossup as to which is better.

Move. In every single activity.

My biggest fails and most bored stares and “when is this over?” whines have happened when I tried “sit and watch the video” in my lesson plan.  These children aren’t made to sit still!  In every activity in the lesson plan, figure out a way they can move some part of their bodies.  These are examples of tips we incorporate in our Stories Online lesson plans:

  • When you hear the word saltar in the video story, jump!
  • Play Matamoscas: a fly-swatter, running game that’s high-energy.
  • Walk around the room finding all the things that are a particular color, or big/small, etc.
  • Pass out vocabulary flash cards and ask children to listen for the word on their card and wave it (even my preliterate preschoolers can remember what word is on their card).

In short, get moving!

Ignore or adapt activity sheets.

It’s tough to find an effective “worksheet” for Spanish class at all, much less for very young children who can’t read or write.  However, we’re pretty proud of the activity sheets we’ve developed for Stories Online (you can see them all and download/print them in your 7-day free trial!).  But some of ours can’t be done by preliterate children, either.  For the ones that aren’t adaptable, simply ignore them.  However, many are achievable as they’re written, and many more are easily adapted for young preliterate learners (see a photo example on our Instagram).  We actually did a separate blog post on that, and it includes a free activity sheet download.

 

Set and focus on SMALL goals. Then repeat.

If you don’t speak Spanish, you don’t have to be told twice that the smaller the goal, the better.  But for those of us who do speak it, often we forget just how many times or how slowly we need to hear a particular word in context before we can incorporate it in communication.  It’s a lot of times.

This means that all learners, and especially preschool children, need very, very small goals.  To illustrate what we mean, we’ve taken some snippets of our Video Stories and put them together into a special preschool lesson.  Note that this lesson isn’t an example of what’s in our Stories Online curriculum- to see that, you really need to experience your free first seven days of learning.  Our Video Stories follow a comprehensible story plot, and then the lesson plans are where children are asked to focus on goals and complete them.

In this preschool lesson video, there are two goals.  Only two.  1: Greet someone with “hi.”  2: Say your name.  That’s it.  Try it out with the young children in your life – can your learners greet someone in Spanish and answer the most frequent phrase they’ll hear when a Spanish speaker finds out they’re learning Spanish: “What’s your name?”

(Okay, it’s not scientific research, but really, this is the phrase every Spanish speaker uses to “test” my kids on whether or not they actually “speak” Spanish.)

Here’s the lesson:

 

What do you think – can your learners accomplish these small goals in Spanish today?

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The first time I taught a kindergarten Spanish lesson, I thought if I read the story La oruga muy hambrienta (The very hungry caterpillar) enough times, kids would learn something.  Right?

So, I faithfully came into my kindergarten classes, once a week for a 15-minute lesson, and read the book to them.  I was animated and I pointed and gestured, but really, there wasn’t a whole lot of comprehension going on.  And as for doing anything with the language?  No.  Mostly, that year was a waste of everyone’s time.
Since then, I’ve learned a lot about comprehensible input and about teaching very young kids.  In Calico Spanish Stories Online, you’ll find a lot of fun, comprehensible stories.  Stories that help kids speak real Spanish to real people.

Even in kindergarten?  Yes, even there.

To prove it, let us give you some free resources to try.  We’ve taken some clips from our Video Stories and put them together into a lesson that’s perfect for kindergarteners.  (Note that these are clips from the Video Stories and not the stories themselves, so this lesson in this video is bonus blog/YouTube content; it’s not part of the member content.)

Ready to try 100% of that member content for free? Click the red button up top.

Here’s the learning target:

I can say something about what I am like and something about what I am not like.

Try out the video, and then try out the free activity sheets below.  We’d love to hear how this goes in your kindergarten classes!

Here are the activity sheets that can accompany this lesson.  Each is an actual Activity Sheet taken from our Stories Online curriculum levels A and B with targets involving describing oneself and other people.

  • Grande & pequeño: 3 Activity Sheets to help young children describe things and people as big or small
  • ¿Quién dice?: Children will identify which characters say, for example, “I’m big” or “I’m smart.”
  • ¿Joven o viejo?: Children will identify which characters are young or old.
  • A describir las personas: Children will select adjectives that describe particular people.

Let us know what you think!
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Summer break = break from kids’ learning?

Is summer break really a good idea relative to children’s learning journey?  That’s certainly a hot topic for teachers and parents, and we won’t debate here.  Surely, though, over two months of little to no contact with Spanish can only hurt language development.

Summer activity record to send home with children learning Spanish

Click for PDF.

Here’s an idea: Let’s encourage kids to keep up those skills over the summer, outside of school programs.  But how?  Kids are given reading logs for the summer; why not for language, too?

Here’s an activity log we call “En casa TicTacTó.”  In it, children find a list of nine activities to choose from.  They choose any three activities per week, across, down, or up, to accomplish a TicTacTó.  This free log has “voice and choice” and fun built right in!  This variety makes it perfect for children in any context: preschool, kindergarten, elementary, homeschool, you name it.  Activities include pretending to shop for toys on Amazon Spain, getting a Spanish-language book from the library, and singing along with Calico Spanish songs.

Where’s the printable list/activity?

To get your free PDF, click here or click the image.  We also know some of you Google Doc gurus want to go in and change up some of the activities to tailor them for your context.  To access the document, click here.  Then, choose “File” and “Make a copy” and edit away!

If you’re already out of school but you have a way to contact school families, such as by your administrative office emailing parents, we encourage you to ask them to email this activity sheet for parents to use at home.  Let’s keep kids involved in Spanish!

For the Sing & Color Activities mentioned in the PDF, direct families here, or get your own to send home with each child.

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Happy Mom’s Day!

Mother's Day printable in Spanish

¡Feliz Día de la Madre!

We recently saw an adorable Mother’s Day “My mom and I” printable activity in English.  We love these activities and thought it was such a great idea we’d do something similar in Spanish. In ours, we’ve featured some of our Stories Online characters with their moms and grandmothers.  Here at Calico Spanish, we are moms and love to honor mothers and all they do, in everything from our content to our support for homeschool families to the way we package and distribute our materials.

What mothers are in our Stories?

In the Stories Online program, here are some of the mamás and abuelas children will meet:

  • At the beginning of Level B, “I Love My Family,” we meet Alicia, la mamá de Pepe, el perro café.  It’s Pepe’s birthday and she has a gift for him, a new collar in his favorite color, negro.  He tells her, “¡Te amo, Mami!
  • Later in Level B, we meet Camilo el conejo blanco in the park and he’s with his abuelo and abuela.  His abuela helps him understand that he’s especial because even though he isn’t athletic and doesn’t like to play soccer like Pepe and Goyo el gato negro, he’s who he was meant to be: he’s good at jumping, he loves to read, and he likes to play hide-and-seek.
  • At the end of Level B, in the lesson on pets, María la mona amarilla wants to tell her friends all about her abuela‘s new pet, a pájaro azul named Perico.
  • In Level C, “I Live Here,” we’re invited into the home of Rita la rana verde and her family.  In their multigenerational home, Rita’s abuela lives with them.  Rita ends her busy day with her abuela helping her find her favorite storybook and reading it with her until she falls asleep.  “Buenas noches, nena.  Sueña con los angelitos,” her abuela tells her.

Kids can meet all of these characters and their friends and family right now, because your first seven days of learning are absolutely free, with no restrictions.  It’s ideal for children ages 5-9 in any learning context, including preschool, kindergarten, elementary, and homeschool situations.

Where’s the activity?

Here we offer you a PDF download of the printable in a version for mamás and a version for abuelas. It asks children to tell us about their mamás and abuelas:

  • My mom/grandma is named _________.
  • My mom/grandma is ___________ and ___________. (Example: tall and smart)
  • With my mom/grandma, I like to ______________.
  • I love my mom/grandma because _________________.

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Mother's Day printable: Mi mamá y yo

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Abuela version of Mother's Day printable in Spanish

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And happy Mother’s Day from the moms of Calico Spanish!

Happy Mother’s Day from Calico Spanish!

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